Enter Mexico

"Have you ever had a dream, that you were so sure was real? What if you were unable to wake from that dream? How would you know the difference between the dream world and the real world?" 

As We (Me and my KLR, "Dark Horse") just enter Mexico and head southeast along the Mexico side of the walled border, a strong and constant wind picked up sand, moving it south across Highway 2; I listen to the sound of it rasping against the left side of my helmet and steer slightly into the wind as to be not blown off the road. It is thick, like a dry fog, and this is all I have to welcome me into Mexico; that and a flow artist twirling ragged home made flag poi at the first stop light into San Luis Rio Colorado. Since I can relate, I take it as a good sign; what good does it do me at all to ever take it as a bad one? 

Nine, ten, eleven hours later I don't know, but I am in Hermosillo just after sunset and just missing a huge downpour; the flooded streets saved plenty of water for me though. I am reminded all too soon how tricky it can be to find a location in Mexican cities; even with multiple pictures of maps zoomed in and out. Fortunately I found an internet cafe and the owner spoke enough English/charades to guide my hand across a new style of keyboard and an online map that still can only help me so much. I connect with my host, Rocio and she offers some help as well. Even though I am less than 3 miles away, I still manage to miss multiple turns. It doesn't help that my windshield and headlights are quite dirty from a full day of riding the desert; this fact helps me to mistakenly discover a small lake instead of a road. I have no choice at this point but to gun it. Through a hundred meters of foot deep water I plowed through; from the side I must have looked like I was jet-skiing. I made it through, but am now soaked - as if being exhausted and semi-lost wasn't enough. Finally some street sign names become recognizable so I pull out my notes one more time, and finally get my bearings again. A few more blocks later, almost falling over, I arrive at the block I know she's on. With calm elation, I hear a girl call my name; I look all around, happy but bewildered to where the sound came from, until I looked up and there she was waving from a second story window. From super dry to super wet, I've made it. Thank God/dess.

 Me, Rocio, and Hermosillo

Me, Rocio, and Hermosillo

It's Rocio's aunt's birthday, so the evening is young; I find a second flow of energy with ease. I am now welcomed to Mexico by a party with family, friends, kareokee, acoustic guitar, dancing, Mexican beer and home made Mexican food. THIS is what I was here for.

 Simplistic, yet abundant - that is a family party in Mexico.

Simplistic, yet abundant - that is a family party in Mexico.

The days to follow included seeing as much of Hermosillo as I could, potential future plans and rooftop chalk drawings under the full sun accompanies with a "cold" temperature outside of 75 degrees F and an hour more of sunlight then I was getting back home in Grants Pass.

 Our rooftop chalk art

Our rooftop chalk art

 Someone else's wall art. I like both. ;)

Someone else's wall art. I like both. ;)

My visit to Hermosillo ends abruptly during an evening of high emotional release due to my heart's major need of release. Rocio, naturally uncomfortable and unwilling to talk it out, kicks me out of her apartment at 3:00 in the morning. I have no choice but to continue south and discover a potential connection from my Nomad Guru and Great Friend, Jason Gastaldo. To keep my vibe up, I do incantations, laugh like a crazy person and sing my heart out as I ride into the night; an act I am not supposed to participate in.

I cannot make the 2 hour ride to San Carlos Nueva Guaymas; I am nearly falling asleep at the handlebars. I find the best spot I can to pull over, which turns out to be a dirt road parallel to the highway, a bush, an some tall dry grass, and then I pass out for an hour or so; completely exposed in the desert, under so many stars.

I awake to coyotes yapping nearby which spurs my energy and I get back on the road. Soon enough I am in San Carlos, and again looking for a new location from a few screen shots of maps. Fortunately I'm dealing with a much smaller city. I find a "yellow house with a thatch roof" and I hope that 8am isn't too early to be knocking. I am greeted by an elder lady and her dog, I ask, "are you Sue?" and she says no, but we soon figure out which Sue I'm talking about and she tells me it's just down the road, second house to the end; I pull up and there's an old white woman looking out her window at me. With only an hour of sleep I introduce myself and how I heard of her, she invites me in and I am relieved once again. She shows me to an unoccupied room that I now call my own, we talk on the balcony that overlooks the bay, she begins rambling about random tragic stories and I nearly explode with tears - I am overwhelmed. I ask to take a nap and pass out for hours.

 Sue

Sue

If you're wondering what happened to Sue's head, she fell down the stairs last August and is still spinning wheels with the doctors looking for problems so that perhaps solutions can be found. It looks as if she had a horn that was chopped off. I digress... she's a very healthy and sweet lady with a story, a perspective and a affliction for just about everything.

San Carlos Nuevo Guaymas is a beautiful little town with mostly Mexican's and a good full handful of retired Americans and Canadians; but mostly large, beautiful, empty houses looking over the water and dozens, maybe hundreds, of big white boats who don't appear to be used much either.

But what beautiful scenery:
 

 My San Carlos home is across on the other side, somewhere under those tall peaks in Sector Bahia.

My San Carlos home is across on the other side, somewhere under those tall peaks in Sector Bahia.

 Looking from those tall peaks back the other way; my place is on the other side of that tall peak in the middle of the bay.

Looking from those tall peaks back the other way; my place is on the other side of that tall peak in the middle of the bay.

 The two peaks themselves; "Tetakawi"

The two peaks themselves; "Tetakawi"

This post could run on, but since my arrival I have joined the San Carlos Gym where I am practicing yoga (and teaching when needed), Tai Chi, Cumbia dance and Capoeira dance-fighting. Steadily I have been adapting to the environment and the culture; my usable Spanish is growing steadily. I've also had my first time "hand reeling" yesterday and caught 7 fish with nothing but my bare hands, some shrimp heads, fishing line, and a few hooks!

I have been fortunate enough to be shown the ropes,.. er, lines, from Jason's 'brother', Roger, who also stays at Sue's as well, but has been a local resident on and off for decades and is currently a mechanic/jack of all trades.

 Myself, JJ and Roger

Myself, JJ and Roger

Overall, a phenomenal start; if I could only begin to tell you what has been actually running through my conscious mind, what You, dear reader, might think. It's been about managing my vibration and keeping calm and positive under times of pressure, else there be pain. 

Much, much more to come; we're just getting started.

Escucha pronto de mi.

 "If your words are no better than silence, say nothing."

"If your words are no better than silence, say nothing."